Morals

Amorality is the cause of many people’s confusion

It should come as no surprise that in modern times men and women find themselves chronically insecure, lost in life and unclear as to their sense of direction and purpose. Commonly where there may be the facade of poise and confidence there is only in reality a desperate clinging to social approval, status and the general notion that one is “moving up in life.” As the meaning and fulfillment in an individual’s work and everyday activities declines there is an ever greater need to compensate the void unfilled with an even better vacation, an even better job and even more friends or “followers.”

For many who are not within the realm of such burgeoning opportunity this kind of social climbing is found to be impossible and such people who see themselves hopelessly stuck “on the bottom” fall into despair and depression, turn to drugs and other forms of addictions, or attempt to escape life through disassociating with their actual experience and identity. If you agree with this bleak description of our world, do you think that this is how things are suppose to be?

They are most certainly not suppose to be like this, and in times past they were not like this. What then is the root cause of these social ills? Where did society go wrong? The answer is that at the advent of the modern world, there was a new way of thinking which began ideologically in the late 19th century, developed and became dominant in the 20th century and is now all that people know in the 21st century, and that way of thinking is that mankind no longer needs a strict moral foundation.

This notion can be seen in the modern world in just about every facet of life. From the doctrine of modern science that insists nature has no moral order, or to modern art and architecture which have dumped all standards of beauty and proportion. The modern world has rejected that there should even be a code of ethics for manhood and womanhood. It has forbidden the inclusion of morals into its education system and it endlessly propagates disfigured entertainment with no moral value through mass media.

As the substitute for morals which previously served as the organizing and binding force of all social function there is instead now a large and complicated system of laws and conventions. These are in constant flux and have been seen to radically transform sometimes within decades, yet requiring strict obedience nearly as soon as they do. Since they are in all cases imposed from the top down, the laws being the dictates of the government, the conventions being set by industry and media, it has become these entities which now organize and bind the mass of people together.

From a bird’s eye view it may not be particularly obvious that this new form of social functioning is inferior to the old. It may even seem superior since the rate and quantity of activity is so much faster and greater than before. But, in the soul of the individual it is entirely neurotic. That social expectations and values are understood now to be merely a consensus with no ultimate basis leaves everyone in a state of suspense as to what this consensus may morph into in the future. Thus, one’s value, one’s work, one’s safety and security, one’s relationships are all at the whims of the tastes and fashions of a crowd mind.

So, when an individual has a decision to make in life, the question “what should I do?” has become very difficult for them to answer. Quite often the only answer which can make any sense to them is to follow the crowd as they perceive it. When they look back and reflect upon where they ended up as a result of many of these decisions, rather than there being a clear sense of choice and consequence there is only a bumbling of rationalizations, emotions and confusion.